Eureka Entertainment to release HITLER’S HOLLYWOOD, the story of one of the most important and most dramatic periods in the history of German cinema, in a Dual Format edition (which also includes the 2014 documentary From Caligari to Hitler) on 5 November 2018.
 
Nazi-cinema was a state-controlled industry, subject to rigid political and cultural censorship. At the same time, it aspired to be “Great Cinema”; it viewed itself as an ideological and aesthetic alternative to Hollywood. A German dream factory.
Rüdiger Suchsland’s Hitler’s Hollywood takes a closer look at the roughly 1000 feature films made in Germany between 1933-1945, examining how stereotypes of the “enemy” and values of love and hate managed to be planted, into the heads of the German people, through the cinema screens.

Features:

  • Option of the original German language version with optional English subtitles OR with English language narration by Udo Kier
  • From Caligari to Hitler: German Cinema in the Age of the Masses – Director Rüdiger Suchsland’s 2014 documentary on the social and cultural impact of German Cinema during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933)

 

Certificate:
E
Actor:
Hans Albers

Udo Kier

Heinz Rühmann

Zarah Leander
Director:
Rüdiger Suchsland
Aspect Ratio:
1.78:1
Number of Discs:
2
Main Language:
German
Subtitle Languages:

English

Run Time:
105 minutes
studio:
Eureka Classics
Theatrical Release Year:
2017

Hitler's Hollywood (Dual Format)

Blu-ray
GBP 8.99

RRP: £12.99

£8.99

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Eureka Entertainment to release HITLER’S HOLLYWOOD, the story of one of the most important and most dramatic periods in the history of German cinema, in a Dual Format edition (which also includes the 2014 documentary From Caligari to Hitler) on 5 November 2018.
 
Nazi-cinema was a state-controlled industry, subject to rigid political and cultural censorship. At the same time, it aspired to be “Great Cinema”; it viewed itself as an ideological and aesthetic alternative to Hollywood. A German dream factory.
Rüdiger Suchsland’s Hitler’s Hollywood takes a closer look at the roughly 1000 feature films made in Germany between 1933-1945, examining how stereotypes of the “enemy” and values of love and hate managed to be planted, into the heads of the German people, through the cinema screens.

Features:

  • Option of the original German language version with optional English subtitles OR with English language narration by Udo Kier
  • From Caligari to Hitler: German Cinema in the Age of the Masses – Director Rüdiger Suchsland’s 2014 documentary on the social and cultural impact of German Cinema during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933)

 

Certificate:
E
Actor:
Hans Albers

Udo Kier

Heinz Rühmann

Zarah Leander
Director:
Rüdiger Suchsland
Aspect Ratio:
1.78:1
Number of Discs:
2
Main Language:
German
Subtitle Languages:

English

Run Time:
105 minutes
studio:
Eureka Classics
Theatrical Release Year:
2017

Customer Reviews

Overall Rating : 4.0 / 5 (1 Reviews)
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Top Customer Reviews

Customer reviews are independent and do not represent the views of Zavvi.

Two serious films

Although 'From Caligari to Hitler' seems to be added as an extra it makes sense to watch this first as it helps the main title 'Hitler's Hollywood' make more sense. Both films are based on Siegfried Kracauer's critical theory that suggests that film reveals the contents of a nations unconsciious (expect a few Freudian terms to be slipped in here and there), both ask the question 'What does cinema know that we don't?' The films do not follow the traditional documentary format but could be better described as filmic essays, the narration approaches a form of poetry and the directors aim seems to be focused on making us think rather than lead us to a conclusion. These films more likely to appeal to film students and those who want to experience a way to critically view our current films and ask the question 'what does cinema know that we don't?' especially useful now that ideology is looking to make a re-enrty into cinema.