Bresson achieves the pinnacle of his art in the tale of a gentle creature’s journey through a cruel world.

A profound masterpiece from one of the most revered filmmakers in the history of cinema, Au hasard Balthazar, directed by Robert Bresson (Pickpocket), follows the donkey Balthazar as he is passed from owner to owner, some kind and some cruel but all with motivations outside of his understanding. Balthazar, whose life parallels that of his first keeper, Marie, is truly a beast of burden, suffering the sins of humankind. But despite his powerlessness, he accepts his fate nobly. Through Bresson’s unconventional approach to composition, sound, and narrative, this simple story becomes a moving parable about purity and transcendence.

Special Edition Features:

  • New 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • Interview from 2005 with film scholar Donald Richie
  • “Un metteur en ordre: Robert Bresson,” a 1966 French television programme about
  • the film, featuring Bresson, filmmakers Jean‐Luc Godard and Louis Malle, and
  • members of Balthazar’s cast and crew
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Plus: An essay by film scholar James Quandt
Certificate:
12
Director:
Robert Bresson
Region:
B
Number of Discs:
1
Main Language:
French
Subtitle Languages:

English

Run Time:
approx. 1 hour 35 minutes
studio:
CRITERION COLLECTION
Theatrical Release Year:
1966

Au Hasard Balthazar - The Criterion Collection

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Bresson achieves the pinnacle of his art in the tale of a gentle creature’s journey through a cruel world.

A profound masterpiece from one of the most revered filmmakers in the history of cinema, Au hasard Balthazar, directed by Robert Bresson (Pickpocket), follows the donkey Balthazar as he is passed from owner to owner, some kind and some cruel but all with motivations outside of his understanding. Balthazar, whose life parallels that of his first keeper, Marie, is truly a beast of burden, suffering the sins of humankind. But despite his powerlessness, he accepts his fate nobly. Through Bresson’s unconventional approach to composition, sound, and narrative, this simple story becomes a moving parable about purity and transcendence.

Special Edition Features:

  • New 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • Interview from 2005 with film scholar Donald Richie
  • “Un metteur en ordre: Robert Bresson,” a 1966 French television programme about
  • the film, featuring Bresson, filmmakers Jean‐Luc Godard and Louis Malle, and
  • members of Balthazar’s cast and crew
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Plus: An essay by film scholar James Quandt
Certificate:
12
Director:
Robert Bresson
Region:
B
Number of Discs:
1
Main Language:
French
Subtitle Languages:

English

Run Time:
approx. 1 hour 35 minutes
studio:
CRITERION COLLECTION
Theatrical Release Year:
1966

Customer Reviews

Overall Rating : 4.0 / 5 (1 Reviews)
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  • 1 4 star reviews
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  • 0 2 star reviews
  • 0 1 star reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Customer reviews are independent and do not represent the views of Zavvi.

One of Bresson's best

A great film, with an amazing performance from Anne Wiazemsky. Not sure the biblical allegory that is oft cited really holds up to much scrutiny, but otherwise probably Bresson's most accesible film.