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Nina (Portman) is a ballerina in a New York City ballet company whose life, like all those in her profession, is completely consumed with dance. She lives with her obsessive former ballerina mother Erica (Hershey) who exerts a suffocating control over her. When artistic director Thomas Leroy (Cassel) decides to replace prima ballerina Beth MacIntyre (Ryder) for the opening production of their new season, Swan Lake, Nina is his first choice. But Nina has competition: a new dancer, Lily (Kunis), who impresses Leroy as well. Swan Lake requires a dancer who can play both the White Swan with innocence and grace, and the Black Swan, who represents guile and sensuality. Nina fits the White Swan role perfectly but Lily is the personification of the Black Swan. As the two young dancers expand their rivalry into a twisted friendship, Nina begins to get more in touch with her dark side - a recklessness that threatens to destroy her.

studio:
20th Century Fox
Director:
Darren Aronofsky
Certificate:
15
Actor:
Natalie Portman

Mila Kunis

Vincent Cassel

Winona Ryder

Barbara Hershey

Sebastian Stan
Theatrical Release Year:
2010
Main Language:
English
Number of Discs:
1
Region:
2

Black Swan (Includes Digital Copy)

DVD
GBP 19.99

£19.99

 

Region 2 DVD (may not be viewable outside Europe).

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Nina (Portman) is a ballerina in a New York City ballet company whose life, like all those in her profession, is completely consumed with dance. She lives with her obsessive former ballerina mother Erica (Hershey) who exerts a suffocating control over her. When artistic director Thomas Leroy (Cassel) decides to replace prima ballerina Beth MacIntyre (Ryder) for the opening production of their new season, Swan Lake, Nina is his first choice. But Nina has competition: a new dancer, Lily (Kunis), who impresses Leroy as well. Swan Lake requires a dancer who can play both the White Swan with innocence and grace, and the Black Swan, who represents guile and sensuality. Nina fits the White Swan role perfectly but Lily is the personification of the Black Swan. As the two young dancers expand their rivalry into a twisted friendship, Nina begins to get more in touch with her dark side - a recklessness that threatens to destroy her.

studio:
20th Century Fox
Director:
Darren Aronofsky
Certificate:
15
Actor:
Natalie Portman

Mila Kunis

Vincent Cassel

Winona Ryder

Barbara Hershey

Sebastian Stan
Theatrical Release Year:
2010
Main Language:
English
Number of Discs:
1
Region:
2

Customer Reviews

Overall Rating : 4.6 / 5 (5 Reviews)
  • 3 5 star reviews
  • 2 4 star reviews
  • 0 3 star reviews
  • 0 2 star reviews
  • 0 1 star reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Customer reviews are independent and do not represent the views of Zavvi.

Black Swan

This was a film that I had been waiting to see for ages and couldnt wait for it to arrive. It didnt take long and arrived in good condition. The film wasnt what I expected at all it was better and a compulsive watch. I have in fact watched it three times. Its a brilliant film and I would recommend anyone who hasnt seen it to do so.

Black Swan (Includes Digital Copy)

Good movie, but creepy at times. Good acting from all the actors

Psychological Drama

Gripping psychological drama in the vein of Dario Argento's 'Inferno' and 'Suspira'. The atmosphere is full of suspense as we follow the lead character in her obsessive quest for perfection and the psychological and physical strain it leaves on her body. The fantasy sequences are haunting, and in these the influence of Argento's stylish Italian horror motifs are seen most. A gripping watch!

Black Swan.

A great psychological thriller with a couple of twists, but be warned; the film takes on a strong fantasy element towards the end. Personally, I loved this, but it may not be to everyone's taste. If you like films that are Machiavellian in nature (think 'Dangerous Liaisons'), then you will absolutely love this. Watch out for Winona Ryder playing Beth McIntyre. She does a great star turn as an ageing, rejected, and frankly, demented Prima ballerina. Natalie Portmann is brilliant as Nina, the new Prima ballerina, and through the film, we start to see how the pressures of ambition and dancing break her fragile nature. Vincent Cassel plays the artistic director Thomas Leroy, who is wonderfully vile and socio-pathic in every imaginable sense. This really is a great 'chick flick' with a dark twist.

black swan is a masterpiece

This is a strange film. It's very original and like nothing we've ever seen before. It is beautifully filmed. Masterfully acted. A story that takes your hand then forces you to sprint with it to the conclusion. One of the best films of the year. Natalie Portman gives the best performance of her career. I absolutely loved Black Swan. I’m just not sure I can accurately say that I enjoyed it. When I first walked into Black Swan, I wasn’t sure what to think. When the movie was over and I walked out, I still wasn’t sure what to think. Despite how that might sound, that is not a criticism, but rather high praise for director Darren Aronofsky (The Wrestler, Requiem for a Dream), and Natalie Portman, who present a movie that is complex, compelling, and never ordinary. It is also one of the year’s best. Aronofsky walks a thin line between madness and genius in his movies, and you are never really sure which side he spends more time on. His previous films can justifiably be classified as being disturbingly brilliant, or brilliantly disturbed depending on your point of view, and Black Swan is no different. His movies are not what you might describe as being “feel good”, but they all are capable of evoking reactions in the audience. That reaction may not always been what they want to feel, but it is always deliberate, and always well done. Aronofsky’s films are not always well received (especially The Fountain, which was critically and commercially panned), but they can be respected for what they attempt. Black Swan is an easy Oscar candidate in several categories. Aronofsky is deserving of a nomination, it will be a shock if Portman does not also receive a nomination, and many of the crew and supporting cast turn in performances that are noteworthy, including Vincent Cassel and Barbara Hershey. It is a film worth seeing, and one that is easily among the best of the year. But it is not a film that you will have fun watching, nor was that the intention. The film revolves around Natalie Portman’s Nina Sayers, a woman who has dedicated herself so completely to the ballet and the art of dance, that it has stunted her development in many ways. She is cold and isolated, and has difficulty relating to people, while still retaining a purity and naivety that teeters between innocence and cowardice. She is afraid of everything, but has no idea why. Fueling this repression is Nina’s mother Erica, a former dancer who achieved only moderate success, and now lives vicariously through her daughter. When it is announced that the star of the show, Beth MacIntyre (Winona Ryder) has been made to retire, the remaining dancers all compete to win the coveted role of the Swan Queen in the first production of the season, a role that will elevate the dancer to fame. The show’s director, Thomas Leroy (Cassel), chooses Nina because of her near perfect mastery of the movements, yet has serious reservations. The character of the Swan Queen is dual in nature, and while Nina can easily handle the White Swan’s role, Leroy worries that she may be incapable of releasing herself enough to truly become the seductive and dangerous Black Swan. In an attempt to coax her out of her shell, Leroy begins a series of mind games that are intended to relax Nina, and challenge her. One of these challenges involves bringing in the dancer Lily (Mila Kunis). Where Nina is the perfect technician without the passion, Lily is all passion with sloppy technique. As Nina attempts to express herself as the Black Swan, the pressure of the role begins to manifest itself in increasingly intense ways that range from visions to physical wounds, and as the opening date nears, Nina battles an increasingly personal and psychological battle against those around her, while attempting to explore her own place in the world.