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  • Description
    Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried and Aaron Paul star in this drama from director Gabriele Muccino. The story follows the relationship between widowed author Jake Davis (Crowe) and his young daughter Katie (Kylie Rogers). Suffering from mental illness, Jake struggles to raise Katie and is forced to leave her in the care of her aunt and uncle. 25 years later a grown Katie (Seyfried) is attempting to overcome the demons of her childhood which have an affect on her developing romance with Cameron (Paul), who is a fan of her father's work. The film also stars Diane Kruger, Bruce Greenwood, Jane Fonda and Octavia Spencer.
  • Product Details
    Certificate:
    15
    Actor:
    Amanda Seyfried, Diane Kruger, Aaron Paul, Russell Crowe, Jane Fonda, Ryan Eggold, Bruce Greenwood
    Region:
    Free
    Number of Discs:
    1
    Main Language:
    English
    studio:
    Warner Home Video

Fathers and Daughters

DVD
1 Reviews
GBP 6.69

RRP: £19.99

£6.69

Save: £13.30

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Region 2 DVD (may not be viewable outside Europe).

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  • Description
    Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried and Aaron Paul star in this drama from director Gabriele Muccino. The story follows the relationship between widowed author Jake Davis (Crowe) and his young daughter Katie (Kylie Rogers). Suffering from mental illness, Jake struggles to raise Katie and is forced to leave her in the care of her aunt and uncle. 25 years later a grown Katie (Seyfried) is attempting to overcome the demons of her childhood which have an affect on her developing romance with Cameron (Paul), who is a fan of her father's work. The film also stars Diane Kruger, Bruce Greenwood, Jane Fonda and Octavia Spencer.
  • Product Details
    Certificate:
    15
    Actor:
    Amanda Seyfried, Diane Kruger, Aaron Paul, Russell Crowe, Jane Fonda, Ryan Eggold, Bruce Greenwood
    Region:
    Free
    Number of Discs:
    1
    Main Language:
    English
    studio:
    Warner Home Video

Customer Reviews

5.0

1 Reviews

5 1
4 0
3 0
2 0
1 0

Top Customer Reviews

Customer reviews are independent and do not represent the views of Zavvi.

A fair but faulted portrayal

This is a good film that gives a fair outline of one of the many kinds of battles dad's face trying to bring up their own children. While the circumstances to the story are particular to this film, there are many other even more general conditions under which dad's struggle to keep children in the face of society's general view that fathers are "unfit" to bring up children on their own. Where the film fails is that it portrays this problem as peculiar to the particular circumstances faced by Crowe's character rather than deploying a much more common and everyday reality of many fathers. This fair portrayal of the issue could have gone much further and much deeper in penetrating the pervasiveness of the battles fathers face today rather than associating it with the particular and unrepresentative individual of the "writer-artist" portrayed at the centre of the film. What is incontestable is the damage the outcomes of these familiar scenarios and all too common legal and social welfare battles have on children. The fantasy part is where the child recovers - we know they dont, generally. I give this film 5 stars for raising an important and pervasive issue, but 1 star for the stereotypical Hollywood treatment it gets, and the association of the problem with such unlikely central protagonists.

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